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Showing posts from September, 2016

Meeting (with TGBHS and TEAHS): Lisa Ford, Oct. 7

The next official meeting of the Triangle Legal History Seminar will take place next Friday, October 7th, in a rare opportunity to join forces with the Triangle Global British History Seminar and the Triangle Early American History Seminar.  
Lisa Ford, from the University of New South Wales, will present her paper, entitled "The King’s Peace and the Imperial Constitution: Boston, 1764-1770."
Please write to Ashton Merck (awb27@duke.edu) for access to the paper.

Babie and Orth Speaking at UNC Law, November 7

It is my pleasure to announce that Paul Babie, professor of law and associate dean at Adelaide University, Australia, and my UNC colleague John Orth will both by speaking at lunchtime on November 7 at UNC Law, on the Torrens title system.  The title of their program is “Property Stories: How Torrens Title Failed to Solve All the Problems, and Actually Created Some.”

Babie's talk is entitled "The Carey Gulley Squatter: Crown and Possessory Title of Torrens Land in South Australia." You may have heard that Babie gave one of the best of the talks at the North Carolina Law Review's terrific symposium on Magna Carta last fall.  And that's really saying something because those talks were fabulous. Babie asked the intriguing question, why did do we remember Magna Carta but not other charters from that era. He focused on the forest charter, for instance, of 1217.  And then he also unfolded how that charter has other implications for progressive property.  I can't d…

David Gilmartin, Sept. 9

Please join us for a discussion of David Gilmartin's paper "Voting and Party Symbols in India" on Friday, September 9, from 4-6 pm at the National Humanities Center.  Light refreshments will be served.
Voting and Party Symbols in India:  The Visual and the Law in Constituting the Sovereign People

Abstract: The establishment and legal regulation of voting practices provides a critical window for analyzing the distinctive meanings attached to the people’s sovereignty as an operative force in electoral democracies.   In India, this is evident in the controversies that have surrounded the use of officially-sanctioned party electoral symbols in election campaigns.   Originally adopted after India’s independence to facilitate voting by a largely illiterate population, symbols have since come to play critical roles as party logos.  But their practical use and “misuse” has sparked considerable controversy, raising questions both about the role of visual images in mobilizing Indian…